Water Cycle Terrariums

We have been learning about the water cycle with a focus on evaporation, condensation and precipitation. To understand more about this process we decided to make a terrarium. This way we could observe first hand how the water cycle works. Similar to the way water evaporates and rises into the atmosphere before condensing and falling as precipitation, in our terrarium, the moisture from the soil evaporates and rises before condensing on the top of our container. It then falls (like rain) to provide moisture to the grass in our terrarium.

It was amazing to witness the water cycle happening right in front of us. Not only did we learn more about evaporation, condensation and precipitation, we also learnt about transpiration. Transpiration occurs when the grass soaks up the water in its roots, then ‘breathes’ with respiration, releasing the water (and oxygen) into the air which then condenses on the container and rains. Amazing stuff!!

 

Moving Water Science Experiment

Today I placed 3 plastic cups on the table.  The two outside cups were filled with coloured water, one with blue water, the other with yellow water. The cup in the middle was empty.  I also had a roll of paper towel on the table.  I posed the question “Is there any way we could get the water from the outside cups into the middle cup without touching the cups.  After much discussion, Dale came up with the solution of placing one end of the paper towel into the outside cup and the other end into the middle cup. We did just that and had another interesting discussion about absorption and colour mixing.

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After a little while, drops of water began dripping into the middle glass…

The next day when we came to school, this is what we saw…

AMAZING!!!

Water Science

We have been learning lots of different facts about water.  We even made our own Water Facts Book.  On Dale’s page he illustrates how water and oil don’t mix.  We thought we’d explore this concept further by dropping some water droplets onto both greaseproof paper and photocopy paper.  When we dropped the water onto a plain piece of paper our water droplet was absorbed by by the paper.  However, when we dropped it onto the wax paper, the water droplet kept its shape.  We discussed how fibrous materials such as paper will absorb water rather than repelling it.  However when the paper has a waxy (or oily) coating, such as grease proof paper, it will be waterproof.  After our discussion we had fun experimenting with the water, greaseproof paper, some eye droppers and straws.  Some of us had races, some of us made mazes to navigate our water droplets through and all of us had a lot of fun.  Take a look….

 

Making Butter

This week we have been learning all about milk.  We have learnt where milk comes from and we have discussed all of the different foods that are made from milk. Two of the foods that came up were cream and butter. When I told the kids that we could make our very own butter from cream they didn’t believe me, so of course I had to show them! We poured some cream into a screw top container, added 2 marbles and screwed the lid on really tight! Then we stood in a circle and took turns to shake the container while listening to the songs ‘Shake it Off’ and ‘The Hippy, Hippy Shake’. At first we didn’t think it was going to work, but we persevered and after about 10 mins of vigorous shaking…………we had butter! If you don’t believe me, see for yourself…..

Here we are doing the ‘Hippy, Hippy Shake’ ……

Nearly there…..

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And now for the finished product. Ta da!

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We spread our butter on some crackers and put it to the test…

And the verdict……….Delicious!!!

Magic Milk Experiment

Today we conducted a very cool science experiment in the classroom. If you want to try it at home, here’s how:

You will need:

A dinner plate
1/2 – 1 cup of milk
1 drop of dishwashing liquid
Food colouring
Simply begin by pouring some milk onto a plate. You will need to ensure you have enough milk to cover the base of the plate. Add a few drops of different coloured food dye to the milk. Carefully add one drop of dishwashing liquid to the middle of the plate. Quickly, a chemical reaction will occur, which will see the colours begin to spread away from the dishwashing liquid and begin mixing and churning around the plate. It’s amazing!

What is the science behind it?

Milk is made up of mostly water but it does contain vitamins, minerals, proteins and small droplets of fat. The fat and proteins are super sensitive to changes in the milk and so when dishwashing liquid is added to the milk, a chemical reaction occurs. The soap and fat work hard to join together, which causes the movement. When food colouring is added we are able to see the chemical reaction occurring. Take a look ……….

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Brain Power

As part of our topic on The Human Body, we investigated the brain today.  We learnt that the brain is the control centre for our body.  It is like a powerful computer that stores our memory and controls how we think, move and react.  We also learnt that it has three main parts – the cerebrum, the cerebellum and the brain stem.  After learning more about the brain, we made our own models of this amazing organ using play dough. We think we did a great job. Take a look…….

Water Cycle Terrariums

We have been learning about the water cycle with a focus on evaporation, condensation and precipitation.  To understand more about this process we decided to make a terrarium.  This way we could observe first hand how the water cycle works.  Similar to the way water evaporates and rises into the atmosphere before condensing and falling as precipitation, in our terrarium, the moisture from the soil evaporates and rises before condensing on the top of our container.  It then falls (like rain) to provide moisture to the grass in our terrarium.

This is what our terrariums first looked like:

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After a few days they looked like this:

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And after a few weeks, they looked like this:

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It was amazing to witness the water cycle happening right in front of us.  Not only did we learn more about evaporation, condensation and precipitation, we also learnt about transpiration. Transpiration occurs when the grass soaks up the water in its roots, then ‘breathes’ with respiration, releasing the water (and oxygen) into the air which then condenses on the container and rains.  Amazing stuff!!

 

Milk, Cream and Butter….

Today we watched a video that showed us how milk gets from the cow to the shelves of our local supermarket. It was very interesting. After learning more about milk we got to try some.  Some of us enjoyed it on it’s own while others added a teaspoon of Milo. Either way, we all agreed that milk is both healthy and delicious!

After enjoying our milk we discussed all of the different foods that are made from milk.  Two of the foods that came up were cream and butter.  When I told the kids that we could make our very own butter from cream they didn’t believe me, so of course I had to show them!  We poured some cream into a drink bottle, added 3 marbles and screwed the lid on really tight! Then we stood in a circle and took turns to shake the bottle while listening to the songs, ‘The Hippy, Hippy, Shake’ and ‘Shake it Off’. At first we didn’t think it was going to work, but we persevered and after about 10 mins of vigorous shaking…………we had butter!  If you don’t believe me, see for yourself.

Here we are shaking the cream…..

And now for the end result. Ta Da…….

Of course we had to try it and it was delicious……

 

 

 

 

 

Bread versus Anzac Biscuits!

In the week leading up to Anzac Day, 2KR learnt lots of interesting facts. Did you know that during the First World War wives, mums and girlfriends made Anzac biscuits to send to their loved ones on the battlefield? Anzac biscuits were cheap to make and most importantly, they stayed a lot fresher than the bread that was originally sent to the soldiers. Making Anzac biscuits in the Oatlands kitchen gave us a fantastic opportunity to test this out.

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After 13 days it is clear to see which food the soldiers would have preferred! The Anzac biscuit is still quite fresh but we don’t think we would enjoy eating the mouldy bread, would you?